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The Gallery was created in 1966 to bring together the works that Concordia University had acquired over the four preceding years. The seven individuals who headed it continued these collection activities according to their interests and priorities up until the time that the current director declared an acquisition moratorium. The Gallery restarted its acquisition program in 2011 following eight moratorium years which triggered an in-depth reflection about the nature and pertinence of collecting artworks in a university context, and which led to the improvement of the conservation conditions and various practices involved in the management of the collection. The acquisition fields were redefined, henceforth focusing on the acquisition of contemporary works linked to the Gallery’s programming and which were created over the last ten years.

Leonard & BIna Ellen Gallery, J. W. McConnell Building, Concordia University, 2010

RECENT ACQUISITIONS

2017
Jo-Anne Balcaen

Balcaen

Mount Rundle, 2014
Video, colour, sound – Hard drive, USB key
3 min. 42 s.
Edition 1/5

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2017 (017.04)

Image: Still from the video

Probing the art world, its inner workings and the complex rules that control them, Jo-Anne Balcaen’s work highlights often hidden aspects of the personal and professional life of artists, such as psychological vulnerability, social pressure from peers, financial stress and the demand to succeed. In the video work Mount Rundle, which she narrates, Balcaen links two events from her own artistic career taking as a starting point a small landscape she painted at age twelve of Mount Rundle, the mountain overlooking the mythical locus of artistic creation in Canada—The Banff Centre. In a neutral and impersonal tone, she recounts that the painting of her childhood was to be a premonition of her artistic destiny, as twenty years later, she would find herself at the exact same spot depicted in the painting, during a particularly fruitless residency at the Banff Centre. This anecdotal narrative brings to the fore several reflections on the unpredictability of the creative process and the difficulties that characterize it, the power relations and constraints of the system in which artists evolve, and the different states of mind they find themselves in.

Raymond Boisjoly

Boisjoly

Author’s Preface, 2015
Installation, 25 inkjet prints and wallpaper paste
345,5 x 917 cm
Edition 1/1

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2017 (017.05)

Image: Installation view, Moucharabieh, Triangle France, Marseille, 2015. Photo: Aurélien Mole. Courtesy of Catriona Jeffries

Author’s Preface is an important work in the recent evolution of Raymond Boisjoly’s practice. It combines his interest for modes of image production and transmission with his research on language as a cultural, administrative and institutional practice. This imposing wall installation is based on the film Divine Horsemen: The Living Gods of Haiti (1985), experimental filmmaker Maya Deren’s black-and-white documentary about voodoo practices created from footage shot in Haiti between 1947 and 1954. The visual elements of the installation are distorted reproductions of Deren’s film, created using an iPod and scanner re-mediation technique that Boisjoly has perfected in recent years. The piece also includes short cryptic phrases written by the artist, liberally inspired by what Deren wrote about the production of the film in an eponymous book published in 1953. Author’s Preface explores different linguistic modes (descriptive, didactic, pragmatic, philosophical, poetic) that highlight the opacity, ambiguity and incompleteness of the signifying systems we use to represent our cultural realities. With its use of pastel colours, Author’s Preface also evokes the bureaucratic aesthetic, calling on us to reflect on the way that administrative praxis shapes artists’ discourse.

Moyra Davey

Davey

Fifty Minutes, 2006
Video, sound – Hard drive
50 min.
Edition 1/5

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2017 (017.06)

Image: Still from the video

Moyra Davey’s first video work, Fifty Minutes, is programmatic in nature as it introduces a deeply idiosyncratic narrative method that Davey will continue to use in later projects. As for most of her videos Davey uses one of her own texts as a starting point and realized this autobiographical work around the format of a standard therapy session of fifty minutes, during which she reflects on five years of psychotherapy she underwent in New York. The monotonous recitation of her recollections is mixed with varied reflections on autobiography, nostalgia, loss, collecting, home life, reading, knowledge and the invention of the self. Invoking many literary and theoretical references, from Sigmund Freud and Jean Baudrillard to W.G. Sebald, Davey’s open narration is accompanied by image sequences depicting different spaces, objects, gestures and people from her everyday life, filmed in an intentionally “non-artistic” manner. As exemplified in Fifty Minutes, Davey’s approach is based on a sustained observation of the world surrounding her, and rooted in a reflection on and narratization of intimate fragments of her everyday life and personal and family history.

Suzy Lake

In the winter of 2017, the Gallery acquired five works from two seminal series of Suzy Lake’s Montreal period (1968–1978) that attest to the trailblazing nature of her work: Transformations (1973–1975) and On Stage (1972–1974). These two sets of works are emblematic of Lake’s early photographic explorations, focused as they are on the representation and modification of images of her own body, particularly her face, which itself would become the centre of her work. Exploring ideas of identity, imitation and disguise in a feminist perspective, Transformations and On Stage also showcase Lake’s use of certain aesthetic strategies that will prove to be integral to her conceptual approach, such as the use of the grid and the repetition of image sequences.

01

Lake_1

Maquette: Suzy Lake as Françoise Sullivan, 1974/2012
Series: Transformations
Archival digital print
82 x 97 cm (framed)
Edition 1/3

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2017 (017.01)

Photo: Courtesy of Georgia Scherman Projects and the artist

In her Transformations, entitled Suzy Lake as… Illan Berci, Gilles Gheerbrant, Jay Lee Jaroslav, Mila Lamer, Gary William Smith, Andrea Stannard, Bill Vazan, Willy Wood and Françoise Sullivan, Lake aims to make visible the intersubjective and evolving nature of identity by transposing features of colleagues and friends that have influenced her way of being, thinking or acting onto her own photographed face. Never presented prior to 2012, Suzy Lake as Françoise Sullivan is the only modified self-portrait of the series that was not printed at the time of its creation in 1974. This work, acquired in its maquette format, highlights the intergenerational relationship between two major female figures of Canadian art that met in Montreal during the early years of Véhicule Art, an artist-run centre that Lake cofounded in 1972.

02
a)

Lake_2.c

On Stage #1 (Bank Pose), 1974/2013
Series: On Stage
C-print, 60,96 x 50,8 cm
Edition 2/10

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2017 (017.02.01)

Photo: Courtesy of Georgia Scherman Projects and the artist

b)

Lake_2.a

On Stage #2 (Miss Montreal), 1974/2013
Series: On Stage
C-print, 60,96 x 50,8 cm
Edition 2/10

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2017 (017.02.02)

Photo: Courtesy of Georgia Scherman Projects and the artist

c)

Lake_2.b

On Stage #3 (Grade 1), 1974/2013
Series: On Stage
C-print, 60,96 x 50,8 cm
Edition 2/10

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2017 (017.02.03)

Photo: Courtesy of Georgia Scherman Projects and the artist

d)

Lake_2.d

On Stage #4 (Accordion Pose), 1974/2013
Series: On Stage
C-print, 60,96 x 50,8 cm
Edition 2/10

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2017 (017.02.04)

Photo: Courtesy of Georgia Scherman Projects and the artist

To accompany the purchase of Maquette: Suzy Lake as Françoise Sullivan, the artist has also donated a set of four photographs taken from her series On Stage (1972–1974): Bank Pose, Miss Montreal, Grade 1 and Accordion Pose (printed in 2013 from the original negatives). Considered to be Suzy Lake’s first major work, On Stage is the first photo project in which the artist turns the camera on herself. In this series, Lake constructively misuses the languages of advertising and fashion photography with the goal of critiquing the representation of women in mass media, and to question the way that identity is constructed in relation to societal expectations. The four works donated to the Gallery combine photographs and texts (in French and English) excerpted from the original work that speak to the cultural, intellectual and linguistic context within which they were originally realized.

Isabelle Pauwels

Pauwels

,000,, 2016
High definition video, colour, sound – SD card
58 min. 30 s.
Edition 1/2

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2017 (017.07)

Image: Still from the video

Isabelle Pauwels’ video works draw influence from experimental and documentary film, as well as from popular forms like reality TV, sitcoms, talk shows, family films and pornography. Through a subtle combination of documentary realism and fiction, and by way of elaborately edited image sequences interspersed with screens of text, Pauwels deconstructs narrative conventions in a way that disrupts the viewer’s frames of reference and expectations. In doing so, she aims to highlight and deconstruct certain thought patterns and clichés that structure social interactions, and reproblematize subjective experience beyond society’s designated roles.

The single-channel video ,000, (2016) is a two-dimensional adaptation of a multimedia performance originally commissioned by the Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center, in Troy, New York, and presented there in 2014. The video tells the story of two intertwined characters vying for recognition and legitimacy: the British Columbia city of New Westminster, a former industrial centre nostalgically hanging onto its past, and a disillusioned actress who, struggling with the humiliations of the film industry, makes ends meet by working part-time as a dominatrix. By contrasting the triumphant narrative of the city and the film industry with the “dirty” economy of daily survival, here embodied by a sex worker, ,000, explores the psychological effects of commerce on human agency and interpersonal relationships.

Krista Belle Stewart

Stewart

Seraphine : Her Own Story, 2014
Video, sound – USB key
38 min. 57 s.
Edition 1/5

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2017 (017.08)

Image: Installation view, Mercer Union, Toronto, 2015. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid

Seraphine: Her Own Story is emblematic of Krista Belle Stewart’s artistic approach, one that is rooted in the reuse and reinterpretation of archival imagery, in this case imagery from film archives. In this video work, Stewart juxtaposes two contrasting portraits of her own mother, Seraphine Stewart (born Seraphine Ned), the first Indigenous woman to become a public health nurse in British Columbia. The left-hand side of the screen presents a black-and-white docufiction produced by CBC/Radio-Canada in 1967 that chronicles episodes in Seraphine’s life before, during and immediately following her nursing studies in Vancouver. The right-hand side of the screen shows colour sequences of Seraphine’s testimony at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, recorded in Vancouver in 2013, where she recounts her experiences at the Indian Residential School in Kamloops, BC. The juxtaposition and dialogue between the two documents foreground an unreconcilable tension between personal memory, historic narrative and fiction, which invites us to question the authenticity of the images and the authority of the narratives through which Indigenous subjectivity is constructed within a colonial and postcolonial Canada.

Ian Wallace

Wallace_Magazine Piece Schema_1970_Ed12_2014

Magazine Piece Schema, 1970
Ink on velum
62 x 102 cm
#25 of an unlimited edition

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2017 (017.03)

Photo: SITE Photography. Courtesy of Catriona Jeffries

Magazine Piece (1970-) is one of Ian Wallace’s “concept pieces”—in situ, exhibition-based installations realized from simple sets of instructions provided by the artist. Approaching the magazine as a mass-produced ready-made that can be appropriated to critique mass media systems, Wallace originally conceptualized Magazine Piece by removing the pages of a magazine and placing them in a line, and then in a grid formation on his studio wall. This work, which has been realized in numerous versions since 1970, continuously carries on a close dialogue with contemporary history, as its social relevance is constantly renewed according to the chosen base material.

In 2017, the Gallery acquired a copy of Magazine Piece Schema (1970), which serves as a visual and textual guide for the realization of an unlimited number of future iterations of the work by other people. With an adaptable grid template, as well as concise instructions (“The cover and facing pages of a mass-circulation magazine attached to the wall in a given arrangement until exhausted by the format”), the schema, printed on translucent vellum paper, functions like an architectural blueprint or a stencil for the mass production of objects. During the realization of each iteration of the piece, the idealized and systematic structure of the schema is brought into tension with the contingent materiality and specific content of the chosen magazine that, as a cultural screen, mediates and reflects certain social realities.

2013
Raymonde April

01
a)

013_01_01

Tout embrasser (Rideaux) 22/517, 2001
Inkjet print on paper – Edition 1/3
91,5 x 139,7 cm (each)

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2013 (013.01.01)

b)

W×d

Tout embrasser (Régis) 36/517, 2001
Inkjet print on paper – Edition 1/3
91,5 x 139,7 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2013 (013.01.02)

c)

013_01_03

Tout embrasser (Régis) 37/517, 2001
Inkjet print on paper – Edition 1/3
91,5 x 139,7 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2013 (013.01.03)

d)

013_01_04

Tout embrasser (Oreillers) 38/517, 2001
Inkjet print on paper – Edition 1/3
91,5 x 139,7 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2013 (013.01.04)

e)

013_01_05

Tout embrasser (Troll) 39/517, 2001
Inkjet print on paper – Edition 1/3
91,5 x 139,7 cm (each)

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2013 (013.01.05)

013_01_06

Tout embrasser (Arbre) 40/517, 2001
Inkjet print on paper – Edition 1/3
91,5 x 139,7 cm (each)

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2013 (013.01.06)

02                           

013_02

Tout embrasser, 2000
16 mm Film transferred on digital support, black and white, sound – Edition 2/2
57 min. 44 s

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.02)

Caroline Boileau

01                                       

013_07_01

Ici et là, à travers, 2011
Watercolour on paper
30,4 x 22,9 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.07.01)

02

09_Boileau

La fée du lit, 2011
Watercolour on paper
30,4 x 22,9 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.07.02)

03

10_Boileau

Sous l’oreiller, 2011
Watercolour on paper
30,4 x 22,9 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.07.03)

04

013_07_04

Encore, les marcheuses, 2011-2012
Watercolour on paper
34,9 x 26 9 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.07.04)

05

013_07_05

L’époustouflée, 2012
Watercolour on paper
34,9 x 26 9 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.07.05)

06

013_07_06

L’insolente, 2012
Watercolour on paper
34,9 x 26 9 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.07.06)

07

013_07_07

L’éclaboussée, 2013
Watercolour on paper
Purchase, 2013
34,9 x 26, 9 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.007.07)

Olivia Boudreau

013_08_01-C(450)

Salle C, 2007
Storage unit (wood, glass), 150 Mini DV cassettes, video of a performance recorded live transferred to a hardrive, colour, sound
Variable dimensions; storage unit: 366 x 10,2 x 10,2 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Gift, 2013 (013.08.01, 013.08.02, 013.08.03, 013.08.04)

Tim Clark

013_03_02.A(450)

Deipnosophistae, 1993
Ink on paper, glue, wood (2 pieces: table, portfolio)
87,5 x 229 x 71,2 cm (table) / 3,5 x 63,3 x 51,7 cm (portfolio)
Edition 1/1

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013

Brendan Fernandes

013_09-B

Foe, 2008
Video, sound – Hard drive, DVD
4 min. 39 sec.
Edition 3/5

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.09.01, 013.09.02)

Photo: Still from the video

Kent Monkman

01                             

013_04_01(450)

Wolfe’s Haircut and Montcalm’s Haircut (dyptic), 2011
Etching and aquatint on paper
Edition 27/35
14,5 x 19,5 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.04.01, 013.04.02)

02

013_05(450)

My Treaty is with the Crown, 2011
Etching and aquatint on paper
Edition 23/75
31,5 x 51 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.05)

03

013_06(450)

The Academy, 2011
Etching and aquatint on paper
Edition 22/75
31,5 x 51 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.06)

Adrian Norvid

013_10-A(450)

Get Stuffed, 2009 (diptych)
Flashe vinyl paint on paper
244 x 254 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.10.01, 013.10.02)

Rober Racine

01

013_11_01(450)

Pages-Miroirs : antifongiquefors, 1989
Ink and graphite on paper, Mirror
22,3 x 14,1 cm / framed: 34,7 x 25,2 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.11.01)

02

013_11_02(450)

Pages-Miroirs : chimériquereflet, 1989
Ink and graphite on paper, Mirror
22,3 x 14,1 cm / framed: 34,7 x 25,2 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.11.02)

03

013_11_03(450)

Pages-Miroirs : douceurgaîté, 1989
Ink and graphite on paper, Mirror
22,3 x 14,1 cm / framed: 34,7 x 25,2 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.11.03)

04

013_11_04(450)

Pages-Miroirs : manadecollutoire, 1989
Ink and graphite on paper, Mirror
22,3 x 14,1 cm / framed: 34,7 x 25,2 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.11.04)

05

013.11.05(450)

Pages-Miroirs : rebelleîlien, 1989
Ink and graphite on paper, Mirror
22,3 x 14,1 cm / framed: 34,7 x 25,2 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.11.05)

06

013_11_06(450)

Pages-Miroirs : saincantique, 1989
Ink and graphite on paper, Mirror
22,3 x 14,1 cm / framed: 34,7 x 25,2 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2013 (013.11.06)

2011
Sophie Bélair-Clément

011_01

See you later/Au revoir : 17 minutes en temps réel, 2008
Video installation and sound, 1/3 – Betacam SP, DVD
18 min.

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.01)

Photo: Still from the video

Olivia Boudreau

011_02_vue1(450)

Box, 2008
Video installation and sound, 1/2 – La Cie hardrive
22 hrs

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.02)

Photo: Video still

Nelson Henricks

011_03(450)

The Sirens, 2008
Video installation and sound, 1/3 – Betacam SP, DVD
16 min.

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.03)

Photo: Installation View, Vox. Centre de l’image contemporaine, 2009

Leisure Projects

011_04_vue2(450)

Folie à deux, 2009
Video and sound, 1/1 – Hardrive, DVD
55 min.

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.04)

Photo: Still from the video

Thérèse Mastroiacovo

01

011_05_01(450)

Art Now (L’Art en Flandre, Aujourd’hui / Art in Flanders, Now, 1992), 2006
Graphite on paper
56 x 76 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.05.01)

02

011_05_02(450)

Art Now (The arts under socialism, being a lecture given to the Fabian Society, with a postscript on What the government should do for the arts here and now, 1947), 2006
Graphite on paper
56 x 76 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.05.02)

03

011_05_03(450)

Art Now (L’art d’aujourd’hui et son public, 1967), 2007
Graphite on paper
56 x 76 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.05.03)

04

011_05_04(450)

Art Now (Montreal painting now = Peinture montréalaise actuelle: Sir George Williams Art Galleries, April 7 – May 8, 1982), 2007
Graphite on paper
56 x 76 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.05.04)

05

011_05_05(450)

Art Now (Spanish Art Now, 1966), 2007
Graphite on paper
56 x 76 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.05.05)

06

011_05_06(450)

Art Now (To be continued: an exhibition of the museum collection, now and in prospect, 1960), 2007
Graphite on paper
56 x 76 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.05.06)

07

011_05_07(450)

Art Now (Art Now, 2005), 2008
Graphite on paper
56 x 76 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.05.07)

08

011_05_08(450)

Art Now (Art Futures: Student Art Now, 1983), 2009
Graphite on paper
56 x 76 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.05.08)

09

011_05_09(450)

Art Now (Art now; an introduction to the theory of modern painting and sculpture, 1933), 2010
Graphite on paper
56 x 76 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.05.09)

10

011_05_10(450)

Art Now (Avant-garde and after: rethinking art now, 1995), 2010
Graphite on paper
56 x 76 cm

Collection of the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Purchase, 2011 (011.05.09)

acquisition PROGRAM

Every two years the Gallery acquires a small number of works due to the limited physical, human and financial resources available. It still occasionally accepts some donations, but favours purchases of works selected by committee.

The Gallery carefully selects the works that are considered for acquisition according to its mandate and collecting orientations. The acquisition criteria are set out in Article 6 of its Acquisition Policy.

The collection now contains more than 1800 objects. Among them, 81,6% (1474 objects) were acquired by donation and 18,4% (334 objects) were acquired by purchase.

collection’S CONTENT

The 1800 works in the collection represent several movements, styles and schools that have shaped Canadian art history, however, the majority of works are dated from the second half of the 20th century. Most of them are works on paper, but painting, print, photography and video are also represented.

MoratoRIUM ON ACQUISITIONS

The Gallery did not acquire any works between 2003 and 2010 because the current director had declared a moratorium on acquisitions. This moratorium was necessary because the vault no longer provided enough space to house new works and becaue it was no longer possible to ensure an adequate follow-up of the acquisitions and to ensure proper conservation. Besides addressing the issue of a lack of human and spatial resources, this acquisition halt also served to re-evaluate the legitimacy of collecting and its guiding protocols, and to stimulate reflection on how to integrate the works in the collection into the gallery’s programming.

More specifically, the seven-year moratorium made it possible to carry out major projects such as the renovation of the vault, the updating of the inventory of works, the redrafting of an acquisition policy and the carrying out of curatorial projects which focus on the permanent collection from a critical perspective. The moratorium was lifted in 2010.